The Sexual Culture Of The French Renaissance

Autor: Katherine Crawford
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521769892
File Size: 32,10 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Read: 5468
Download or Read Book
Beautifully written, lively, and original, Katherine Crawford's study of French Renaissance sexual culture makes a compelling case for reading sexuality through poetry, poetic theory, astrology, and philosophy in unusual ways. Providing an anatomy of some of the lesser-examined elements that contribute to the development of sexual ideology in a given culture, The Sexual Culture of the French Renaissance makes an important contribution, not only to the study of sexuality in Renaissance France, but to sexuality studies more generally.'-Carla Feccero, Professor of Literature, Feminist Studies, and the History of Consciousness, University of California, Santa Cruz 'The Sexual Culture of the French Renaissance fills an important gap in the history of sexuality. Before Crawford's book, the contribution of the sixteenth-century thinkers to the creation of modern, regulatory sexuality was unclear. Crawford shows how French writers, especially poets, refigured Italian neo-Platonism and Petrarch's verse to create a distinctly French, thoroughly heterosexual normativity. French historians, literary specialists, students of gay history and Renaissance scholars of all sorts should read The Sexual Culture of the French Renaissance.'-Kathryn Norberg, Associate Professor of History and Women's Studies, University of California, Los Angeles

Reclaiming Catherine Of Siena

Autor: Jane Tylus
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226821285
File Size: 69,54 MB
Format: PDF
Read: 4995
Download or Read Book
Catherine of Siena (1347–1380) wrote almost four hundred epistles in her lifetime, effectively insinuating herself into the literary, political, and theological debates of her day. At the same time, as the daughter of a Sienese dyer, Catherine had no formal education, and her accomplishments were considered miracles rather than the work of her own hand. As a result, she has been largely excluded from accounts of the development of European humanism and the language and literature of Italy. Reclaiming Catherine ofSiena makes the case for considering Catherine alongside literary giants such as Dante and Petrarch, as it underscores Catherine's commitment to using the vernacular to manifest Christ's message—and her own. Jane Tylus charts here the contested struggles of scholars over the centuries to situate Catherine in the history of Italian culture in early modernity. But she mainly focuses on Catherine’s works, calling attention to the interplay between orality and textuality in the letters and demonstrating why it was so important for Catherine to envision herself as a writer. Tylus argues for a reevalution of Catherine as not just a medieval saint, but one of the major figures at the birth of the Italian literary canon.